Clifford Chance Watson Glaser Practice Test Answers

This solved test aims to help you actually learn from your Watson Glaser experience on Clifford Chance's website.

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If you took the Watson Glaser sample test on Clifford Chance’s careers website, you may have noticed that no answers or explanations are provided.

The following page provides detailed answers to all 40 questions on the test, so you can actually learn from the experience.

In addition, we provide answers to some FAQs regarding this test.

Let’s go.

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Watson Glaser Test on Clifford Chance Website


FAQs

Click any question that interests you, or jump down to the solved test.

How Many Times Can I Take the Test?

You can take the test as many times as you like. You will have to re-submit your name every time.

How Is the Test Scored?

The Clifford Chance Watson Glaser Practice Test will give you only final percentage scores based on the three test categories according to the RED Model:

  • Recognizing Assumptions – 8 questions on the Recognition of Assumptions section (Section 2).
  • Evaluating Arguments – 8 questions on the Evaluation of Arguments section (section 5).
  • Drawing Conclusions – 24 questions on the Inference, Deduction, and Interpretation sections (Sections 1, 3, 4).

How Are the Scores Calculated?

Each category in your score report is scored based on the number of correct answers in the relevant section/s:

  • Recognizing Assumptions / Evaluating Arguments – 12.5% for every correct answer. 8/8 = 100%
  • Drawing Conclusions – 4.2% for every correct answer. 24/24 = 100%.

Your total score is a weighted average of these three percentages:

Total Score = (Assumptions + Arguments + 3 x Conclusions) / 5

Is the Test Similar to the Actual Watson Glaser?

For the most part, yes. The test emulates the structure, level, and time constraints of the actual Watson Glaser rather similarly. The Inference section is somewhat more challenging than in the actual test, in our opinion, while the Deduction section is somewhat easier – but that’s just an opinion.

However, the major difference is that the Clifford Chance WG Practice Test follows the older version of the Watson Glaser – a version that contained 8 questions in each section.

The questions in the current version of the Watson Glaser test are divided as follows:

  • Inference – 5 questions
  • Recognition of Assumptions – 12 questions
  • Deduction – 5 questions
  • Interpretation – 6 questions
  • Evaluation of Arguments – 12 questions

If you are serious about passing your Watson Glaser, we strongly recommend JobTestPrep’s Watson Glaser Preparation course. Further below we give you all the reasons why.

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Clifford Chance Watson Glaser Test Answers

Clifford Chance Watson Glaser Practice Test Score


Section 1 – Inference

 

Statement for Questions 1-8

“Chamonix is one of the oldest ski resorts in France. Last year, the Chamonix-Mont-Blanc Valley authorities introduced a climate and energy action plan, the first in the French Alps. The plan commits to reducing greenhouse gas emissions in the area by 22 percent. Among the proposed measures is a ban on the most polluting lorries using the nearby Mont Blanc tunnel. Climate change will have a major impact on the valley’s main economic activities: less snow on low-altitude ski slopes and the risk of increased pressure on high-altitude ski slopes have been recorded in recent studies. Natural habitats, river patterns, forests and agriculture might be radically transformed, increasing the likelihood of hazards such as avalanches, floods, and landslides.”

Question 1

The Chamonix-Mont-Blanc authorities have never created a climate and energy action plan before.

  • True
  • Probably True
  • Insufficient Data
  • Probably False
  • False

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is True.

The text clearly states that “…the Chamonix-Mont-Blanc Valley authorities introduced a climate and energy action plan, the first in the French Alps.” Therefore, nowhere in the French Alps, including in Chamonix-Mont-Blanc was a climate and energy action plan ever created.

Question 2

Although air quality is a great concern for those living at the foot of Mont Blanc, noise pollution is arguably the most noticeable at a local level.

  • True
  • Probably True
  • Insufficient Data
  • Probably False
  • False

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Insufficient Data.

While there is some indication that noise could be a problem in the area – namely the lorries (and other vehicles) passing through the tunnel, there is nothing mentioned in the text regarding noise. Therefore, there is no information in the text to even determine a “probably” answer.

Question 3

The passage of lorries through the Mont Blanc tunnel has led to increases in air pollution in the valley.

  • True
  • Probably True
  • Insufficient Data
  • Probably False
  • False

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Probably True.

The action plan specifically addresses the issue of “polluting lorries” passing through the tunnel, which indicates that it is probably a major reason for the increase in air pollution. However, since the direct relationship between lorries and pollution is not explicitly mentioned in the text, it is only a “probably” answer.

Question 4

If measures are not taken to address climate change in mountainous regions, the risk of landslides and avalanches will increase by 22 percent.

  • True
  • Probably True
  • Insufficient Data
  • Probably False
  • False

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Insufficient Data.

This question is tricky. The answer definitely isn’t True or Probably True, for 2 reasons:

  1. The 22 percent data relates to a past effect and not a future effect.
  2. Moreover, the aforementioned 22 percent increase was in pollution, not in avalanches and landslides.

However, there is also no specific data based on which we can negate this conclusion.

Question 5

There will be no checks carried out to prevent the most polluting lorries from using the tunnel.

  • True
  • Probably True
  • Insufficient Data
  • Probably False
  • False

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Probably False.

While the text clearly states that:Among the proposed measures is a ban on the most polluting lorries using the nearby Mont Blanc tunnel.”, the text does not explicitly mention any planned checks. Therefore, the answer isn’t False.

However, it is safe to assume that occasional checks are going to be necessary to enforce the proposed ban, and it is therefore probable that such checks will be carried out.

Question 6

Despite the ravages of climate change, Chamonix will continue to lure tourists since the majority of ski slopes are above 2000m.

  • True
  • Probably True
  • Insufficient Data
  • Probably False
  • False

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Insufficient Data.

That is for 2 reasons:

  1. It mentions a future prediction that is not explicitly mentioned in the text.
  2. It mentions certain fact that is not provided in the text at all (2000m).

Question 7

Over the next five years, greenhouse gas emissions in the Chamonix-Mont-Blanc Valley will be lower than in neighboring ski domains.

  • True
  • Probably True
  • Insufficient Data
  • Probably False
  • False

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Insufficient Data.

The answer here follows the same reasons as the previous question – (1) a future prediction and (2) an unstated fact (5 years).

Question 8

Climate change will have a greater economic impact on high-altitude ski resorts compared to low-altitude resorts.

  • True
  • Probably True
  • Insufficient Data
  • Probably False
  • False

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Insufficient Data.

Again, a future prediction that is not explicitly mentioned in the text.


Watson Glaser Test Preparation

If you are serious about passing your Watson Glaser test, we strongly recommend JobTestPrep’s WG Test Preparation.

  • The most authentic preparation – follows the real WG rules and challenges
  • A diagnostic test to focus your prep on your weaker spots
  • Highly detailed guides and additional practice drills for in-depth understanding
  • A money-back guarantee policy

Show Screenshots

What Do You Get?

Test Simulations

  • 1 Watson Glaser Diagsnostic Test
  • 3 Full Watson Glaser Test Simulations

Additonal Practice Tests & Drills

  • 3 Infecernces Practice Tests
  • 3 Assumptions Practice Tests
  • 5 Deductive Reasoning Practice Tests
  • 4 Interpretations Practice Tests
  • 3 Arguments Practice Tests

Study Guides

  • 5 Interactive Study Guides Covering All Test Sections

Start Preparing Now

Full Disclosure: We are affiliated with JobTestPrep. Clicking the links helps us provide you with high-quality, ad-free content.


Section 2 – Recognition of Assumptions

 

Statement for Questions 9-13

“While owning a pet can be expensive and is occasionally an inconvenience, it’s a good thing to do if you want to improve your chances of living a satisfied life.”

Question 9

It is possible to make decisions that can impact on how satisfied a life you live.

  • Assumption Made
  • Assumption Not Made

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Assumption Made.

It is necessary to assume that decisions that affect life satisfaction exist, in order to state that owning a pet is such a decision.

Question 10

Some pet owners put up with the cost of inconvenience, but don’t necessarily live a satisfied life.

  • Assumption Made
  • Assumption Not Made

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Assumption Made.

The first part of the assumption is evident. If “owning a pet…is occasionally an inconvenience”, then the assumption that “some pet owners put up with the inconvenience and keep their pets” is made.

As for the second part, that assumption is made in the second part of the statement that says that owning a pet willimprove your chances of living a satisfied life.” Therefore, not all pet owners will necessarily live a more satisfying life.

Question 11

Pet owners will always lead a more satisfied life than those who don’t own pets.

  • Assumption Made
  • Assumption Not Made

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Assumption Not Made.

According to the statement, owning a pet will “improve your chances of living a satisfied life.” As explained in the previous question, that statement makes the exact opposite assumption – that not all pet owners will indeed live a more satisfying life.

Question 12

There would likely be less unhappiness in the world if more people owned pets.

  • Assumption Made
  • Assumption Not Made

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Assumption Not Made.

This one is particularly counterintuitive (in our opinion, at least.) and therefore, the explanation will be a bit longer than usual.

Here’s the catch – while the sentence in the question is a possible conclusion of the given statement, it is not an assumption upon which the statement is based.

  • Conclusion – Pet owners are more likely to live a satisfying life. Therefore, if more people owned pets, there would likely be less unhappiness in the world.
  • Assumption – if you say that pet owners are more likely to live a satisfying life, then you necessarily also think that there would likely be less unhappiness in the world if more people owned pets.

The difference is not self-evident.

Getting back to the definition of an assumption – it is a piece of information that someone, while making the statement, is taking for granted.

Or, in a “formula”:

Does someone have to think that [ASSUMPTION] before they can state that [STATEMENT]?

Does someone have to think that “there would likely be less unhappiness in the world if more people owned pets” in order to think that “pet owners are more likely to live a satisfying life?”

The answer is no. One may deduce that and come to such a conclusion, but it is not an assumption that someone necessarily makes before (logically speaking) making the statement.

Question 13

Those who don’t own pets should not expect to live more satisfied lives than those who do.

  • Assumption Made
  • Assumption Not Made

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Assumption Not Made.

The explanation here is rather similar to that in the previous question. One does not need to make the given assumption in order to state that pet owners are more likely to live a satisfying life.

It is a possible conclusion, not an assumption.

 

Statement for Questions 14-16

“The courage to undertake an unplanned assignment is a reward in itself.”

Question 14

The thrill of facing unplanned assignments requires no special recognition.

  • Assumption Made
  • Assumption Not Made

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Assumption Made.

The given assumption means that a person who faces unplanned assignments is motivated by the thrill and excitement of it, rather than by praise or rewards. That assumption is basically a restatement of the original statement, which makes it a necessary assumption to make.

Question 15

People who take risks are less concerned about the success or failure of an endeavor.

  • Assumption Made
  • Assumption Not Made

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Assumption Not Made.

There is nothing in the statement that relates to either risk, failure, or success.

Question 16

Only courageous people will be willing to be part of a project that has no guidelines to follow.

  • Assumption Made
  • Assumption Not Made

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Assumption Not Made.

That assumption is not necessary for making the statement. We know that a person facing an unplanned assignment is rewarded by a feeling of courage. That does not mean that only people who are already courageous will face such assignments.

Again, that is a possible interpretation and not a hidden assumption.


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Section 3 – Deduction

 

Statement for Questions 17-24

“Damage to roads in the area has made them unsuitable for loads over one ton. These loads are being transported to the capital by air, but as air resources are limited, they are restricted to carrying food and medical supplies. Roads cannot be repaired until medical emergencies are dealt with. Therefore:”

Question 17

Medical supplies need to be taken by air.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

Only loads of medical supplies that weigh over one ton need to be taken by air.

Question 18

Food can be taken to the capital by road.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Follows.

Food can be taken to the capital by road If the load weighs less than one ton.

Question 19

Materials for reconstructing the roads are being flown in due to roads being unsuitable for heavy loads.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

We know that only shipments of food and medical supplies are being flown in.

Question 20

Currently only food or medical supplies are arriving in the capital.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

Currently, loads of over one ton of only food or medical supplies are arriving in the capital. Smaller loads of other goods can still arrive in the capital via the roads.

Question 21

Available air transport is capable of transporting loads heavier than one ton.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Follows.

It is specifically stated that loads over one ton cannot be transported via the roads, and that they must be shipped by air. Therefore, air transport necessarily has that capacity.

Question 22

The roads into the capital are passable.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Follows.

It can be understood from the text that loads smaller than one ton can be taken into the capital through the roads. Therefore, the roads must be passable, even if they are damaged.

Question 23

There are insufficient materials in the capital to start rebuilding the roads.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

We know nothing about the amount of material in the capital and therefore cannot deduce anything about it.

Question 24

The roads around the capital are the ones most severely affected.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

We are not given any information on the relative shape of roads around the capital compared with other roads.


Section 4 – Interpretation

 

Statement for Questions 25-32

“An accounting computer program, MagicNumber, is Wisdom Software’s biggest selling product, with its development involving 20% of programmers and 30% of marketing staff. DesignAid, a graphic design program, is the latest offering from the company. It is definitely expected to sell more copies than MagicNumber and will have fewer programmers working on its design, but more marketing staff.”

Question 25

DesignAid will bring in greater profits for the company than MagicNumber.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

While DesignAid will sell more copies than MagicNumber, it is not guaranteed that it will generate more profit. The price for every copy, for instance, may be lower.

Question 26

Most programmers at the company did not work on the MagicNumber software.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Follows.

We know that only 20% of the company’s programmers worked on MagicNumber, so the majority of them (80%) did not work on it.

Question 27

The more marketing staff that work on a piece of software, the greater its sales are likely to be.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

While the conclusion sounds reasonable, it does not follow beyond reasonable doubt. It may be the case, for instance, that the graphic design market is larger than accounting, and therefore more marketing staff is required.

Question 28

Wisdom Software varied the percentage of marketing and programming staff that worked on the two software projects.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Follows.

That fact is explicitly stated in the text – less programmers and more marketers worked on DesignAid than on MagicNumber. Therefore, the percentage of each group will be different from one project to another.

Question 29

The more programmers that work on the development of new software, the greater the sales will be once released.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

That conclusion is directly negated by the information in the statement – DesignAid has less programmers working on it than MagicNumber and is still expected to sell more copies.

Question 30

It’s difficult to predict whether DesignAid will actually sell more copies than MagicNumber.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

The text states that DesignAid is “definitely expected to sell more copies than MagicNumber.” Since a prediction regarding DesignAid’s success has already been made (while the program is still under development), it can be concluded that this prediction was not difficult to make.

Question 31

More money will be generated from DesignAid than from MagicNumber.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Does Not Follow.

The answer here is the same as in question 25. While we know that DesignAid will sell more copies, we know nothing about how much revenue it will generate in comparison. The pricing of both programs can differ, for example.

Question 32

Wisdom Software aims to sell to more than one customer type.

  • Conclusion Follows
  • Conclusion Does Not Follow

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Conclusion Follows.

The two products, MagicNumber and DesignAid, are designed for two very different industries – accounting and graphic design, respectively. Therefore, it can be deduced beyond a reasonable doubt that Wisdom Software is trying to sell to various markets.


Section 5 – Evaluation of Arguments

 

Statement for Questions 33-40

“It is worthwhile for a business to invest in training employees.”

Question 33

Yes. Employees expect to receive regular training these days.

  • Strong Argument
  • Weak Argument

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Weak Argument.

The argument deals with a notion irrelevant to the question at hand. Whether employees expect something or not is their subjective emotional state and is irrelevant to the main issue of the original statement – is it worthwhile for employers to invest in employee training.

Question 34

Yes. Research shows the amount of money spent on training is positively related to profitability.

  • Strong Argument
  • Weak Argument

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Strong Argument.

This is an argument that is both relevant and important. It both addresses the core of the statement (is training employees worthwhile for employers) and shows a research-based benefit for the employer.

Question 35

No. Employees tend to ignore what they learn in training when doing their job.

  • Strong Argument
  • Weak Argument

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Strong Argument.

This argument is also relevant and important. It is both relevant – in directly answering the question of benefit for the employer, and important – by suggesting that employee training will eventually have no effect.

Question 36

No. Training can be very expensive.

  • Strong Argument
  • Weak Argument

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Weak Argument.

While this argument presents an important aspect of the issues for employers – the financial cost, this argument is irrelevant. The argument that training is expensive lacks meaning by neglecting to mention the other side – the possible benefit for the employer.

Question 37

No. Employees learn better on the job than in formal training.

  • Strong Argument
  • Weak Argument

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Strong Argument.

The reasons for this argument being strong are identical to those detailed in question 35.

Question 38

Yes. Employees work more effectively when they have the proper training.

  • Strong Argument
  • Weak Argument

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Strong Argument.

The argument is both relevant to the issue, and important – as it shows a direct benefit for the employer that results from training in the form of improved work efficiency.

Question 39

Yes. Providing training will increase employee motivation.

  • Strong Argument
  • Weak Argument

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Strong Argument.

The reasons for this argument being strong are identical to those detailed in the previous question. Note that while motivation is an emotional state, similar to what is described in question 33 (employees expect to…) it is still relevant since motivation is directly related to an employee’s performance on the job.

Question 40

Yes. Employees appreciate it when they are offered training opportunities.

  • Strong Argument
  • Weak Argument

Answer and Explanation

The correct answer is Weak Argument.

Similar to question 33, this argument focuses on the mental state of the employees, which is irrelevant for the issue of whether the employer is going to benefit from it.

Watson Glaser Test Preparation

We strongly recommend JobTestPrep’s Watson Glaser Test Preparation.

  • The most authentic preparation – follows the real WG rules and challenges
  • A diagnostic test to focus your prep on your weaker spots
  • Highly detailed guides and additional practice drills for in-depth understanding
  • A money-back guarantee policy

Show Screenshots

What Do You Get?

Test Simulations

  • 1 Watson Glaser Diagsnostic Test
  • 3 Full Watson Glaser Test Simulations

Additonal Practice Tests & Drills

  • 3 Infecernces Practice Tests
  • 3 Assumptions Practice Tests
  • 5 Deductive Reasoning Practice Tests
  • 4 Interpretations Practice Tests
  • 3 Arguments Practice Tests

Study Guides

  • 5 Interactive Study Guides Covering All Test Sections

Start Preparing Now

Full Disclosure: We are affiliated with JobTestPrep. Clicking the links helps us provide you with high-quality, ad-free content.

Contact us

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